The climate crisis: we are not reducing emis…

Before March 2020, very few people in the world could say they had heard or used the word “lockdown” in the past 24 hours. Six months later, we have all grown accustomed to hearing about lockdowns every day of our lives, even if we don’t live in English-speaking countries. No commuting to work, no school, no gym and no sports, no crowded restaurants and bars, no holidays - the list of restrictions could go on. In nearly every country in the world, life seemed to pause for a period: no cars in the street, no planes in the sky, no light in office buildings. In the absence of any other reason to be cheerful, a hopeful consideration started to circulate on news outlets and social media: at least the planet can breathe a little. Videos showing wild animals

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